An Age Old Mistake That Still Haunts Astrologers

©  Copyright Terry MacKinnell 2011, 2016 Under the Berne Convention

The ancient Greek astronomer-astrologer Hipparchus in the late 2nd century BC introduced the Vernal Point (VP) as the calibration technique for the astrological ages based on the VPs position amongst the zodiacal constellations.  The VP is the position of the Sun at the vernal equinox around 21st March each year. Hipparchus commenced the tradition of calibrating the astrological ages based on the location of the VP in one of the 12 zodiacal constellations.  This is a mathematical technique as it is not possible to actually see which constellation the Sun is ever located within as it is always daytime when the Sun is visible.

Sunrise in Baghdad, Iraq 20 March 2016
Sunrise in Baghdad, Iraq 20 March 2016

The above illustration shows the Sun rising at the vernal equinox on the 20th March 2016 in Baghdad, Iraq (in deference to the Sumerian and Mesopotamian astronomer-astrologers who defined the zodiacal constellations thousands of years ago).  The inclusion of the zodiacal constellation boundaries is for reference purposes. The constellation of Aquarius sits well above the horizon and the Sun is located in one arm of the constellation of Pisces.  The constellation boundaries are irrelevant for astrological purposes as they have been defined by modern pagan astronomers.  Furthermore there is no evidence the ancients had constellational borders.  The real estate style subdivision of the sky into constellation is a modern phenomenon.  Based on Hipparchus’ system, the above indicates the world is currently in the Age of Pisces.

The VP has been in the constellation of Pisces for two thousand years or more and remains in the constellation of Pisces.  This is why most astrologers claim we remain in the Age of Pisces.  Most research astrologers accept the zodiacal constellations as symbolic markers only for the 12 sidereal signs of exactly 30 degrees each.  The sidereal zodiac was invented by the ancient Greeks (or Babylonian astrologers) to tidy up the zodiacal constellations in their evolving practice of horoscopic astrology.

 A portrait of Hipparchus of Nicaea from "The School of Athens" by Raphael
A portrait of Hipparchus of Nicaea from “The School of Athens” by Raphael

Unfortunately for astrologers over the following period (equivalent to the length of an age), Hipparchus failed to realize that the old zodiacal constellations had a much older method of calibration. The older method of calibrating the zodiacal constellations is a visual technique. All old astronomical techniques were visual—mathematics took an insignificant role in ancient astronomy. Hipparchus did not use the ages old visual technique as he was obviously transfixed by the new mathematical techniques developed in his era.

I am much indebted to a paper by Rumen Kolev—Some Reflections about Babylonian Astrology.[1] In this paper, Kolev explains the five basic principles applied to ancient astronomy techniques in Babylon. In summary, three of these principles state the visible light directly received from a stellar object was of primary concern, as the ancients believed “God is Light.” In those days, the view of the heavens by the unaided eye was the only method of determining astronomical phenomena. The other two principles are that the two key times for astronomical observations are around Sunrise and Sunset.

In ancient times, the telescope was preceded by the line of the horizon and Neugebauer states that Babylonian astronomers were mainly concerned about astronomical phenomena on the horizon.[2] For example, a major Babylonian text dated 1400–1000 BCE supplies the heliacal rising dates of thirty-four stars and constellations according to their 360-day annual calendar.[3] In ancient Upper Egypt, the heliacal rising of the star Sirius marked the beginning of the year.[4]

The heliacal rising of a star or planet is its first appearance on the eastern horizon in the early morning sky just before the rays of the Sun obliterate the stars from the night sky. The term “heliacal rising” unfortunately has different interpretations.  The definition of the “true heliacal rising” is when a star or planet, etc., rises with the Sun but because the Sun is visible the planet or star cannot be seen.  This is the ‘mathematical’ system employed by Hipparchus as the position of the Sun in a constellation must be calculated.

The alternative to the “true helical rising” is the “visible heliacal rising” when a star or planet, etc., can be seen on the eastern horizon just before the approaching sunlight obliterates the star or planet from view.[5] My use of the term “heliacal rising” refers exclusively to the visible heliacal rising. In most ancient societies, the visible heliacal rising (or setting) of a stellar object was one of the most important calibration techniques applied to a stellar object.  The “true” heliacal rising technique is a ‘modern’ mathematical technique probably invented by Hipparchus.

The ancient Greek author Hesiod, a contemporary of Homer, mentions the heliacal risings of the star Arcturus and asterism, the Pleiades, as if the reader of his times clearly understood what he was talking about.[6] To many ancient people, the heliacal phenomena of stars and constellations were an integral part of their calendar. In practical terms, the heliacal rising of a body occurs about one hour before Sunrise, but this will vary with latitude, season, and the brightness of the bodies involved. Rumen Kolev also states the heliacal rising (or setting) of a stellar object must occur before the Sun rises (or after it sets)[7] which is another way of saying the “visible heliacal rising”.

Gavin White in his book Babylonian Star-Lore proposes the most relevant astronomical feature of ancient times (presumably other than the position of the Sun and Moon) were the stars on the eastern horizon just before dawn.[8] White goes further and claims that the first star maps were actually a calendar in the sky, with the equinoxes and solstices as the reference grid for the calendar.[9] In the earliest times of civilization, mankind referred to the stars in their heliacal mode with a specific focus upon the two annual equinoxes and solstices. Their New Year, commencing at the spring equinox, elevates this point above the autumn equinox and two solstices.

This ancient view of the cosmos is basically in agreement with my approach to the astrological ages based on precession. The modern approach to calibrating the ages using the Vernal Point developed by Hipparchus is incongruous to the original methods of observing the stars and constellations. This incongruity of using the position of the Sun at the vernal equinox as the calibrator for the astrological ages is put into context by Nicholas Campion, who states that in observational astronomy it makes no sense to place the Sun in a constellation or among stars, because whenever the Sun is visible the stars are not.[10] Observational astronomy was the astronomy of the ancients.

Elementary astronomy provides the reason why my rectification of the ages is half a sign in advance of the accepted norm amongst astrologers until now – it is because the commonly accepted ages based on the VP are half an age late! The VP is located at the Sun’s position on the vernal equinox (around 21 March each year). The heliacal zodiacal constellation is viewed approximately one hour before the Sun rises. As students, most of us are taught the Earth rotates on its own axis once per day, and all 360 degrees rise above the horizon in twenty-four hours. Therefore, in two hours, on average, thirty degrees (or one zodiacal sign) will rise up over the horizon.  In one hour, approximately, fifteen degrees of the ecliptic rises—this is equivalent to half a zodiacal sign. This is the source of the discrepancy between the ages as defined by Hipparchus and the ages based on the ancient visible heliacal method. The difference between the ancient techniques of the heliacal rising zodiacal constellation at the VE compared to the modern VP method is approximately fifteen degrees, half a sign/age or about 1,075 years.  In ancient times, the zodiacal constellations were meant to be read via their visible heliacal position when applied to the astrological ages. The error Hipparchus made in 127 BCE when he inadvertently used the VP in place of the visible heliacal method delayed his ages by approximately 1,075 years.

I am not the only researcher who acknowledges the heliacal rising of the zodiacal constellations at the spring equinox as the astronomical framework for the ages. The archeo-astronomer Sepp Rothwangl in Considerations About the Start of the Age of Aquarius[11] claims that, in ancient times, a new constellation rising on the eastern horizon before Sunrise on the morning of the Northern Hemisphere spring equinox was the main criterion for the start of a New Age. Rothwangl also states that such a change from Pisces to Aquarius has already occurred, thus indicating the arrival of the new Age of Aquarius.

Hipparchus suffered from a calibration error when he applied the VP method to precession and astronomers and astrologers have adhered to this erroneous VP calibration technique ever since.  If the ancient heliacal method is applied to the zodiacal signs, a very different time frame is provided compared to the Vernal Point method. For example, in 2016 at the vernal equinox, the Sun (VP) sits in the constellation of Pisces, though the constellation of Pisces cannot be seen. The Vernal Point will remain in the constellation of Pisces for many more centuries. However, if you are awake one hour before dawn, when the stars are still visible on the eastern horizon, the last stars seen rising up from the eastern horizon before the sky turns blue is the constellation of Aquarius.

One hour before sunrise 20 March 2016 in Baghdad, Iraq
One hour before sunrise 20 March 2016 in Baghdad, Iraq

 

The above illustration one hour before dawn on 20th March 2016 in Baghdad shows the constellation of Aquarius sitting just above the horizon with no stars visible in the constellation of Pisces.

Therefore, the constellation of Aquarius is currently the visible heliacal rising constellation. The constellation of Aquarius has been the visible heliacal rising constellation for centuries. The conundrum is that, based on the Vernal Point located in the constellation of Pisces, we are supposedly in the Age of Pisces and will remain so for many centuries while based on the visible heliacal rising of the constellation of Aquarius, we are in the Age of Aquarius and have been in the Age of Aquarius for centuries.  The latter assertion is substantiated by historians who claim the arrival of Modernity occurred about 500 years ago.[13]

It is one thing for an astrologer-astronomer from over 2,000 years ago to make a mistake, but to not correct this mistake at the first opportunity is another massive mistake by astrologers.

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Illustrations

Star illustrations courtesy of Stellarium software – stellarium.org

A portrait of Hipparchus – Wikipedia, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hipparchus_by_Raphael.jpg

References

[1] Rumen Kolev, “Some Reflections about Babylonian Astrology,” http://cura.free.fr/decem/09kolev.html

[2] The Exact Sciences In Antiquity, p. 98

[3] “MUL.APIN.” Wikipedia. Retrieved 02:15, 16 June 2008, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=MUL.APIN&oldid=217193345

[4] Ronald A Wells, “Astronomy in Egypt,” Astronomy Before the Telescope, p. 34

[5] Brady’s Book of Fixed Stars, p. 323

[6] Shining in the Ancient Sea, p. 41

[7] Rumen Kolev, “Some Reflections about Babylonian Astrology,” http://cura.free.fr/decem/09kolev.html

[8] Babylonian Star-Lore, pp. 8–9

[9] Babylonian Star-Lore, p. 23

[10] The Dawn of Astrology, p. 81

[11] Sepp Rothwangl, “Considerations About the Start of the Age of Aquarius,” http://cura.free.fr/xxv/21sepp2.html (Retrieved 3 April 2007)

[12] John H Rogers, “Origins of the ancient constellations: I. The Mesopotamian traditions,” Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 108, 1, 1998, p. 9

[13] Modernity. (2016, March 12), Wikipedia, Retrieved 08:27, March 14, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Modernity&oldid=709662496

 


 

The above is a modified extract from “The Dawning – Shedding New Light on the Astrological Ages

The Dawning by Terry MacKinnell

Join the Macro-Astrology group to keep on track with the evolving conversation on the astrological ages.  I post to many groups and sites but nearly all these posts are also published at the Macro-Astrology FaceBook group like a central depository:

 

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Preview to a new book on the astrological ages AVAILABLE NOW

For those readers of this blog that are interested in diving into the deep end of the astrological ages, my first book on the astrological ages will hopefully be published later in 2010.  It has been a writing project in progress for three years and it will provide a definitive explanation of the astrological ages, the mechanics of the astrological ages, and some important divisions of the astrological ages based on decanates (decans or one-third of an age).  Most of the content is devoted to the correlation of the astrological ages to historical developments over the last 12,000 years.

Some readers of this blog may not want to wait until later in 2010 for the book.  Therefore I have produced a pdf version of the first ten chapters of Part 1 of the book  (including the preface, two appendices, and glossary) for $US5 a copy and available at macro-astrology.com

The following is extracted from the beginning of Chapter 1 of the draft version of the new book:

The musical Hair proudly proclaimed in the late 1960s that ‘this is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius’. Since then the Age of Aquarius has become part of our cultural milieu to the extent that most westerners have an opinion on the Age of Aquarius, including those who are against astrology. Occasionally when I express to someone that the Age of Aquarius arrived within a few years of 1433 AD, the response is usually one of amazement and sometimes hostility. The most common response is along the lines: “Isn’t the Age of Aquarius just starting around now or soon?”  This is because the ages, or more specifically the Age of Aquarius, have entered into the realm of contemporary mythology.  

On any day usually over ten new references to the Age of Aquarius are found somewhere on the web, and each week a number of newspaper articles from around the world will reference it.[1] They commonly assume that the start of the Aquarian age coincided with the 1960s and 70s rebellious youth, hippies and appearance of the counter culture, alternative culture or New Age movement. The second assumption in these newspaper articles (but particularly noticeable in New Age, psychic or mystical websites) is that the Aquarian age will usher in some kind of utopia, higher consciousness or superior age. Many concepts are associated with the Age of Aquarius and they fascinate idealists and dreamers. Unfortunately, the information that is broadcast throughout western media and books accounts for less than one percent of the true reality of the astrological ages. The Age of Aquarius sparks idealistic concepts and interpretations without any recourse to research, substantiation or any supporting evidence. Some astrologers show greater knowledge and expertise on the subject but they also fail to agree on the concrete details of the astrological ages.

What is the Age of Aquarius and what is its meaning?  What came before it?   How long does it last?  When exactly does the Age of Aquarius start and how long is its dawn?  Is there any connection between the ages and the common astrological sun-signs?  For example, will someone born with Aquarius strong in their horoscope handle the new Aquarian age better than people without this Aquarius?  Despite the acceptance of the Age of Aquarius into our cultural heritage, very little is known about it by the general public. Even astrologers don’t fare much better. It is commonly expressed that the Age of Aquarius will usher in a new age of peace and harmony. This statement assumes that the age that Aquarius will replace was negative or somehow lower in standard than Aquarius. The age before the Aquarian age is the Pisces age. Is the zodiacal sign Pisces bad and Aquarius good? Not in modern astrology but traditional or earlier forms of astrology did assign positiveness and negativity to different signs and planets.

Each zodiacal sign is a collection of positive and negative archetypes, and some signs are more positive or negative than others. As a new age replaces an older age, a new set of positive and negative archetypes replaces the old set of positive and negative archetypes – possibly with a mildly different ratio of positiveness to negativity. Nevertheless, there is a cultural expectation that a new and bright dawning of the Aquarian age is going to bring to the world an utopia without wars, greed and corruption. And that small communities will live an organic existence in this mythical semi-medieval paradise, at one with the environment and cosmic forces. The Aquarian age is expected to be far more positive than the former Pisces age, but this implies that Aquarians in society would demonstrate greater achievements or positivism in their lives compared to Pisces people. To my knowledge, this has never been the case. Many people in western society expect that a soon to arrive new Aquarian age will correct all the ills and problems of the world. Culture is not rational and people tend to cling to their cultural values like a security blanket. Acknowledging that the Aquarian age arrived over 500 years ago undermines that cultural expectation and suggests that the utopia associated with the Aquarian age is a fantasy. This hard reality is fiercely resisted.

The situation is little better among astrologers who also fall to the cultural expectation of an Aquarian age utopia. Very few astrologers research or study the ages and, among those that do, there is very little agreement about the ages and the Age of Aquarius specifically. The purpose of this book is to answer the unanswered questions of the ages to anyone who is interested based on research stretching over two decades. The astrological ages are truly fascinating as a new reference point for history and current world developments and ultimately may appeal more to historians than astrologers.

The material in this book is controversial to many astrologers due to its radical and innovative approach to the ages. For over two thousands years, astrologers have followed the lead of an Ancient Greek astronomer, Hipparchus (c.160-125 BC) as the initial authority on the ages. This situation has parallels in the scientific world. Until the Renaissance, Ancient Greek and Roman scientists such as Aristotle, Galen and Ptolemy were the accepted authorities in their fields. Once European scientists from the Renaissance onwards started testing their theories, they discovered that experiments failed to confirm many of their claims. The introduction of empirical experiments from the Renaissance onwards resulted in the modern scientific revolution. The position Hipparchus took in relation to the ages has not undergone the same thorough testing until now. This major oversight by astrologers in the field of the ages has prolonged a significant error Hipparchus unwittingly made. This is not an implied criticism of astrologers, as astrologers have not had the benefit of government funded research, unlike their distant cousins in academia over the last 500 years. Without funding, astrological research based on the continuation of an antiquated approach to the astrological ages is understandable.

This book focuses upon three critical areas involving the ages. Firstly, the correlation between periods of time based on the ages and the corresponding historical events based mainly upon traditional history.  Secondly, the accurate assignment of dates for the cusp of the ages to within only a few years margin of error. Therefore, when I state that the Age of Aquarius arrived in 1433 AD, the error range is 1431-1433 (i.e. two years). In contrast, there is a huge variation of thousands of years for the possible start of each age among astrologers. For example, Nicholas Campion produced a list of expected dates for the arrival of the Aquarian age that is over six pages long and ranges from 1447 (a slightly inaccurate date that I supplied some years ago) to 3621 AD.[2]  Thirdly, the emphasis will be taken away from the ages as homogenous periods and much attention will be placed on historical developments within ages that apply to only portions or specific parts of ages. Ages are approximately 2,150 to 2,160 years long and are not a constant figure. At this point of the cycle of ages at least, each age is slightly shorter in length compared to the previous age.

 


[1] Information provided by Google Alerts for the period 12 – 19 Nov 2007

[2] The Book of World Horoscopes, Pgs 489-495

The Future in the Age of Aquarius

The Age of Aquarius arrived in the 15th century exactly in tune with the arrival of the modern world.  Anything modern is aligned to the sign Aquarius.  If you want a good rundown on the Age of Aquarius check the Modernity topic at Wikipedia.  This topic is not about astrology, it is about history, but it accurately narrates the arrival of the Aquarian age in the 15th century.    

 

Wikipedia’s Modernity splits modernity into three time frames.  The Early Modern Period is 1500 – 1800, followed by the Modern period, and late in the 20th century some commentators state that the post-modern period arrived.  The commonality of these three periods is ‘modernity’.  Furthermore there are very sound astrological reasons why modernity since 1500 has been divided into three sections.  These three divisions align themselves very well with the first three sub-ages of the Age of Aquarius. 

 

There is another archetype associated with Aquarius that is often overlooked – the future.  The future is ruled by Aquarius which is why astrology is considered to be ruled by Aquarius.  You may think – what is the big deal about the future?  The big deal is that before the Age of Aquarius arrived in the 15th century, people did not think about the future.

 

There is one very good reason why people did not think about the future – because by and large the future was much the same as the past.  Perhaps someone made an improvement to the plough, or someone learnt how to build arches and so on, but change occurred rarely and infrequently so that each generation lived much the same way as the previous generation.

 

Contrast this with our modern Aquarian world.  I was watching a movie recently that was made only twenty years ago.  Already it was markedly dated as no one had cell phones.  In the IT world, the performance specifications of computers generally double every two years but with the same or lower price tag attached.  We are surrounded by change, and this change does not appear to be abating.

 

According to Robert Heilbroner in his book Visions of the Future there is no reference in ancient clay tablets or Egyptian texts that there was any mention of a future any different to their present.  The past was basically the land of changelessness.  Heilbroner claims that around 250 years ago the changeless Yesterday ended and “…. that the future now enters into human consciousness as a great beckoning prospect.” [Pg 11]

 

This change did not occur universally, it was a notable development limited to Western Europe and North America, which is where the Aquarian age made its first major impact.  Ages do not impact the entire world the same way at the same time.  Astrological ages are like the bow wave from a boat.  The bow wave slowly spreads out to affect a wide expanse of water.  Those nations closer to the bow get affected first. 

 

We take the future for granted.  Today kids have Futurama but Baby Boomers had the Jetsons.  At school in the 1960s it seemed like only a few decades in the future that we would have the option of a holiday to the Moon.  We think about the future and in the Aquarian age the future has become commonplace.

 

A classic example of how futurism has entered our world is the prospect of climatic and environmental devastation from pollution.  Most pundits are claiming that the biggest problem the world is facing is the environmental catastrophe if we do not reign in pollution.  The environmental catastrophe lies in the future.  When in the historic past has human society been faced with a future problem of similar magnitude? In the past societies faced problems as they arose, usually due to some marauding army.

 

In the modern world the future has become just another space to fill up.  We expect the future to be technically more stunning than the present provided we don’t all die from the consequences of our consumerist extravaganza.  The future holds both positive and negative issues for us to consider, think about and debate.  This is another example of the Aquarian age in action. 

 

The mass confusion amongst astrologers and laypersons about the arrival of the Age of Aquarius is sure to make a comic documentary one day.  Aquarius is associated with numerous familiar archetypes other than the future such as flight, democracy, electricity, computers yet astrologers do not have anywhere near the consensus that the Aquarian age has arrived. 

 

The reason why there is so much confusion amongst astrologers about the arrival of the Aquarian age is that astrologers have inherited a methodology applied to the astrological ages that is over 2,100 years old.  In the 2nd century BC an ancient Greek astronomer and astrologer ‘discovered’ the astrological ages.  He applied a specific technique to the zodiacal constellations to calibrate them. 

 

Since the 2nd century BC astrologers have continued to use this ancient technique.  This situation is very similar to science.  Many ancient Greeks and Romans stated many scientific concepts such as Aristotle, Galen and Ptolemy.  In the scientific world, all these ancient claims were thoroughly examined commencing with the Scientific Revolution commencing in the 15th century (naturally in the same century as the age of Aquarius arrived).   Most ancient claims were relegated to the dustbin of history once empirical evidence confirmed or denied the ancient claims. 

 

Since the 15th century science has been funded by governments, and so scientists have the means to check all the ancient claims.  Unfortunately astrology is not funded by governments, and so any research must be funded by individual astrologers.  This has seriously impeded some aspects of astrology.  Astrologers have not reviewed the claims of the ancient Greek astronomer and astrologer who developed the technique of calibrating the ages. 

 

My research clearly shows that the ancient technique which is still revered by astrologers is patently incorrect.  I don’t intend to go into detail here about the ancient technique and its errors but the result of these serious errors has created the current confusing situation.  Based on the ancient technique the Age of Aquarius is not due until around 2600.  To get around the problem that so many Aquarian developments are occurring in the world astrologers fall back upon the cusp argument.

 

The cusp argument states that before a new age arrives that there is a blurring of influences from the old age and new age before the new age arrives.  No serious or reputable astrologer has ever claimed that cusps in astrology work in this manner.  The cusp argument is just one of a number of band aids that have been put on the astrological ages to hide the incongruity of a world full of Aquarian developments occurring in the supposed age of Pisces.

 

Perhaps in the future astrologers will come to terms with the Aquarian age that arrived in the 15th century.  Until then we must reside in the comical present situation where over five hundred years of the Aquarian age has already transpired yet astrologers are still arguing if the Aquarian age arrived in the 20th century or if we must wait until 2600.

The Quest for Peace in the Age of Aquarius

Is the peace orientated New Age movement related to the Age of Aquarius?  This is murky territory as the term `New Age’ has become a virtual brand image for a whole range of disparate concept and images.  Behind the ubiquitous New Age sits the Aquarian Age, but if the New Age is murky, the Aquarian Age is ethereal.  There are a number of reasons why the Aquarian Age is a wraith-like figure, and they all lie with the uncertainties surrounding the astrological lore associated with the great ages. 

 

The Aquarian Age, along with the Pisces Age and all the other ages associated with the zodiacal signs do not have a monopoly on large scale epochs or periods.  The Hindu Yugas, Mayan and Aztec calendars, cycles of the outer planets (especially the combination of Jupiter and Saturn) and cycles based on the monthly lunation cycles are examples of some well trod avenues by the ancients in an attempt to corral historical events into meaningful brackets.  However it is the ages based on the zodiacal signs that have made the greatest inroads into urban myth.

 

Though the term `the Aquarian Age’ gets bandied around regularly, few people outside of the arcane world of astrologers know why these ages exist.  Without going into astronomical detail, the world spins on its axis every 24 hours as it makes its annual jaunt around the sun.  However this axis behaves like a spinning top, and like a top this axis wobbles.  It takes almost 26,000 years for this wobble to make one revolution.  This has direct consequences on earth, because very slowly, the orientation of the earth based on the seasons slowly move in relation to the position of the stars and constellations.

 

The evidence suggests that 4,000 years or more ago the ancient astrologers in Mesopotamia defined 12 zodiacal constellations circumnavigating the earth in a band where the sun, moon and planets are usually located – and it is very possible they did this to calibrate the effects of the wobble.  Due to the 26,000 years wobble of the earth’s axis, as seen from the earth, all the stars and constellations shift by one zodiacal sign approximately every 2150 years. 

 

About an hour before dawn on the March Equinox (northern hemisphere spring equinox) around 21st March each year, you will see the constellation of Aquarius just above the eastern horizon – but very quickly the stars will disappear due to the rising sun.  2150 years ago at the March equinox, you would have seen the constellation of Pisces.  2150 years in the future you would see the constellation of Capricorn.  It is this slow movement of the zodiacal constellations against the eastern horizon at the March equinox that traditionally has been used to calibrate the ages. Did the ancient astrologers know that their zodiacal constellations slowly moved over thousands of years?

 

Though we lack the understanding of the motives of the ancient astrologers there is very little agreement or understanding in the astrological world today about the ages such as the Age of Aquarius.  Astrologers who research ages, such as the Aquarian Age, are few and far between, with less than 200 recognised as contributing significantly to the ongoing debate over the last century or so.  Astrologers agree on very little with respect to the astrological ages, and differences of opinion dominate the ongoing arguments. 

 

The approach to the ages I have pioneered is almost considered heretical by most astrologers because my research clearly indicates that not only is the world in the Aquarian age, it has been in the Aquarian age for many centuries.  This is extremely disappointing for those believing a new Aquarian age is around the corner to bring peace to this world.

 

The focus of my research is not on the ages, but sub-periods of the ages. My big breakthrough in understanding these ages occurred in 1988 when I discovered that each age of some 2150 years each, had 12 sub-ages of around 179 years each.  These sub-ages are much more manageable when dealing with history compared to the cumbersome ages.  Many people now know that the common zodiacal signs can be subdivided, and the most common division is decanates (abbreviated to decans).  A decan is a third of a sign.    

 

For example the world is in the first part of the Aquarian Age, the Libran decan of the Aquarian Age.  Libra rules peace (amongst many other things), and the desire for peace expressed by so many people around the world is allied to the fortunes of this Libran decan of the Aquarius age.  The fortunes of this Libran decan are increasing all the time, albeit slowly, but it is not until the end of the Libran decan around the year 2148 and beyond, that full expression of Libra’s peace will appear.  This is due to a little known quirk of the ages – the ages go `backward’ through the zodiac, and so they are strongest at their end and weakest at their beginning – the exact reverse of traditional zodiacal signs that go `forward’ through the zodiac. 

 

Therefore when the Libran decan of the Aquarius age comes to its end c.2148, it will be at full strength.  This peaking of the Libran decan of the Aquarius Age around 2148 will be like a breaking wave.  The wash from this breaking wave will pass over the succeeding several centuries.  This is a key time when the world is at one of its greatest potential to be a garden paradise and focused upon beauty, compromise and peace plus equality of the sexes. 

 

Though the epoch of peace is not yet arrived, it is under development.  Before something occurs it must be aspired to.  There is no doubt that significant sections of the world’s population aspire towards greater peace and equality of the sexes and the astrology of the ages indicate that this aspiration will see fruition in the centuries to come.  We only get to see the early formative stages of this push towards peace and appreciation of beauty.  We should value whatever peace there is, and foster the desire for more peace as this sentiment is a growing phenomena.  We  may not see the tree but we can watch the sapling grow!

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